There’s a lot more to textbooks than just a hefty price tag. Here’s a little history and background, some facts and stats, and of course tips and tools for saving money on textbooks.

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More than ever before, college students have greater options and opportunities for taking in (and sharing as well as creating) information and entertainment. Textbooks, note-taking, class collaboration, research, social interactions . . . it’s all available from multiple mediums and vehicles and nearly anywhere at any time. With the rise of distance-learning and with changes to textbook formats (rentals, eBooks, and customized packages) and greater interactivity in the form of cheaper more-powerful more-portable computing all happening right now, we wanted to examine the relationships between college students and technology (full info about our larger survey here). Here’s what we found.

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Technology can be a huge help in college. It can help you communicate, find information, share resources, add comfort to your dorm room, remind you of deadlines, and so much more. It can also be a huge time-suck, distraction, and temptation. There’s no doubt that you need solid technology on campus (for work and for fun) and that college students tend to be some of the most-gadgetized early adopters of new tech. Use this handy infographic to make sure you’re using technology to your advantage rather than your detriment.

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With Father’s Day on Sunday and summer school in effect, we’ve got Pops on the brain — particularly the hilarious, heartwarming, relationship-building, potentially embarrassing campus visits from dad. Whether your papa is far away and a “drop off freshman year, pick up at graduation” kind of dad or a dad who is nearby and wants to visit you every weekend (thanks, but no thanks, daddy-o), your college years are key to forming your new adult relationship with your father. And remember, even if he doesn’t visit often or he can’t say it, your dad is proud of you!

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Congratulations on wrapping up your senior year of high-school! Well done. Heading off to college is still a few months away so why not use that time to prepare for the experience by ditching the high-school mentality, opening your mind for the changes ahead, and getting into some good habits now so you can start freshman year off right?

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Part of getting a college education is about learning the things that aren’t in books or in lectures. In fact, much learning is done in terms of self-maturation and navigating things like time-management, friendships and relationships, health and wellness, and finances. College is about academics but it’s also about finding your groove, employing best practices, balancing work and fun, realizing your strengths and weaknesses, and developing efficiencies to help you succeed without compromising quality or ethics. It’s all important and part of the larger experience. With this school year wrapping up, summer sessions nearing, and some time to reflect before fall semester, read what other students have found helpful and give some thought to incorporating these tricks into your own college routine.

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Summer is coming. What are your plans for the next few months until you head back to school? While you certainly want to relax and forget about the stresses of college studies, you may also want to devote some time to financial management and saving money. Tuition isn’t cheap and the money decisions you make during your undergraduate years can shape your post-college financial future (just ask anyone with student loans or someone who was convinced that a free t-shirt was a good reason to take on a high-interest credit card). Take a few minutes and check out our tips for saving and generating some cash this summer.

  1. Invest in a Short-Term CD: If you have any sort of a nest egg that you won’t need over the summer months, consider investing it in a short-term CD. The interest rate you receive won’t make you rich but it will be more than what you'd get leaving your money in a checking account account and you won't be tempted to withdraw it for debit-card purchases. Starter CDs require just a small amount of money for a small amount of time so if you have a few hundred dollars or more and you won't need it for six months or so, bank it in a CD for more interest. Remember that the more you invest at first and for the longer the duration, the more interest you'll earn, but the penalties for early withdrawal can be substantial so don't over-commit. Check rates online at NerdWallet or Bankrate.
  2. Relax in General and Relax on Entertainment Expenses: College can be stressful so it's expected that you unwind and let off steam. But given that this is college we're talking about, nothing is done on a small scale. Big exams and big papers tend to mean big parties immediately following. Take time this summer to enjoy things being a little less intense all around. Without the stress of hardcore studies and exams and deadlines, you can chill on smaller, cheaper scale. Instead of hosting that costly mega-bash or bar-hopping, get together with friends and family for things like game night, day hiking, walking dogs, catching up while doing some deck sitting, and movie marathons when summer storms hit.
  3. Work: Take a part-time summer job or an internship. In addition to earning some money, you'll meet new people, make valuable connections, gain experience, figure out what you like doing and are good at, and come to appreciate your free time a lot more. If you're serious about your direction already, get the scoop on summer internships (it's not too late!) If you're still finding yourself, enjoy working without the pressure of making it into a career and be open to doing stuff like waiting tables (you'll make amazing friends and eat cheap) or do landscaping (you'll get a tan and be ripped). If you're on the less-active side of things, turn Web time into paid time and do surveys for a company like Pinecone Research.
  4. Pay Off Credit Card Debt: Every dollar you pay down on your balances is one less dollar you have to pay interest charges on moving forward. Take a look at your balances and use any money you earn over the summer to bring down your debts. Credit-card debt is a killer whether you’re in school or not, and the sooner you get it paid off, the more money you can save. Remember that you don't have to pay it all at once, just chip away at it by every month paying off more than you spend.
  5. Take Advantage of the Time at Home: If you’re currently living off-campus, do not make the mistake of remaining in that housing over summer break if you’re paying monthly rent. Move out or sublet the place and go home for the summer where the cost of living is much less. Even though living back under your parents’ roof can be a pain, you can save big time on expenses. If mom and dad are the generous type, you’re likely to enjoy free food and laundry services while you save on several months’ rent. Just be cool about it and show your appreciation. Help out around the house, hug your folks, and give thanks for how good it is to come home and find support and love.

If you hadn’t already noticed, the cost of college is astounding. Even if you’ve never been a planner, it’s important to understand that the average college student now graduates with a stunning $27,000 in student loan debt. Kick back all you want over the summer, just keep costs in mind. For every dollar you don’t spend this summer, that’s one more dollar you can put toward your loan balances.

Guest post courtesy of MoneyCrashers.com‘s Josh Hall, a personal-finance writer who discusses college costs, money management, and smart budgeting tips.


Got a summer internship already lined up? Still looking for one? Considering whether an internship is right for you? We can help. Here’s the scoop on types of summer internships, how to be a good intern, and what to expect in terms of compensation and experience and subsequent job leads after internship.

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March is just around the corner and with it comes the countdown to the best college vacay known to humankind: Spring Break! Whatever you’re up to, travel or volunteering or catching up on much-needed sleep or chilling with your family back home or parties by day and night, get your must-do’s organized so you maximize your break time and return to college rejuvenated.

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Over a 40-year career, a college graduate earns $650,000 more than someone with some or no college, the Pew Research Foundation found. While there are some anomalies in the data, you’ll generally increase your lifetime income by finishing a degree. While this can be an enormous boon if you are raising a child, buying a house or planning to retire, it also can improve your daily life.

There are plenty of ways to get those last credits under your belt, including online education opportunities that adapt to your schedule. For instance, you can use a college locator like CollegeOnline to find learning opportunities in your area. If you stopped college before you finished your degree, here are five benefits that may motivate you to finish your education:

1. Higher marketability and better job retention rates.

The College Board’s Education Pays study revealed that college graduates have better job retention rates in a recession-related layoff than their peers who did not finish college. Even if a college graduate is laid off from work, she’ll have an easier time finding another job than a peer who does not have an undergraduate degree. If you faced tough times since the 2008 recession, getting a degree can increase your prospects of thriving through the next recession.

2. Improved self-esteem and confidence.

The Education Pays study also reported that college graduates are better equipped to handle difficult challenges and report more satisfaction when doing so. Over time, this can lead directly to more confidence on and off the clock, and higher rates of self-esteem.

3. Access to better jobs.

The desire to get out of a dead-end job can drive many adults to return to college to finish their degree. When you have a bachelor’s degree, you will qualify for more jobs within your organization and outside the organization. You can interview for better jobs, move up within your company and begin to derive a true satisfaction from what you do, day in and day out.

4. Expanded horizons.

A college degree often forces you to study subjects you might not otherwise have tackled, simply because you need to fulfill a requirement. This can broaden your perspective and offer you new ways to relate to colleagues, friends, family members and your community. If you’ve been putting off your plan to go back to school because you feel that you aren’t very good at math or writing, take heart. Studying these subjects as part of a degree requirement may have unexpected benefits. If you had stuck to a path that was more comfortable to you, you might not reap the benefits that would come from learning new things.

5. New friends and networks.

The connections many people make when in college can have a significant impact on their lives. So if you do decide to go back to school, get involved in the community or make friends with others who are in your classes. You can even connect with friends from online classes via LinkedIn, Facebook and other social networks. After college, your friend may be able to get you an interview (or a job) at her work. Without a college degree, you might not get a leg up on the sort of job you want.